Behavioral Study Proves that Diabetes Distress is Highly Responsive to Intervention

A recent study in non-clinically depressed adults with type 2 diabetes compared three interventions to reduce Diabetes Distress and improve self-management. All three interventions utilized varying degrees of computer-assisted self-management.

Published in Diabetes Care by UCSF’s Lawrence Fisher, PhD, this study showed that Diabetes Distress is extremely responsive to intervention, with older adults realizing significant reductions in Diabetes Distress early on, and younger adults realizing similar reductions later. Reductions in Diabetes Distress were also accompanied by significant improvements in healthy eating, physical activity, and medication adherence, even though overall A1c was not affected.

In the future, Dr. Fisher and his team including the Diabetes Center's Umesh Masharani, MD, of the Justine Kathryn Schreyer Diabetes Care Center at UCSF hope to identify the minimal, most cost-effective interventions to reduce Diabetes Distress and improve self-management. Click here to read the article.